The artists behind Borderless by Estefania Puente

The artists behind Borderless by Estefania Puente

Art is a reflection of our society and the fact that nowadays we are leading movements toward decentralized and democratic art speaks about the impact of tech. New technologies, not only offer new ways to sell, promote, and distribute art but also new mediums and tools for artists to express themselves plus the opportunity to make a living out of it. This is just the beginning of a new way of doing art, without intermediaries or gatekeepers and the tech that is coming will just keep improving this experience. As an art lover and a newbie in the Web3 ecosystem, I can only invite other people to have curiosity and openness to explore the latest art experiences in the digital world. Art From Future (AFF) is a Web3 peer-to-peer community educating and building decentralized art projects in the Metaverse and IRL (in real life). For their second decentralized Metaverse exhibition, AFF worked with their community to gather 26 artists to exhibit and present their artworks at Protoworld. As part of their community, for this exhibition, I’m playing the role of a curator where I get to meet artists through Twitter and Discord. I got the incredible opportunity to discover Mélissa Martinez, AViz, Leila, João Salazar, and Lucifuge. Beyond promoting the artists’ work and inviting collectors to grab their NFTs, I also had the chance to have closer contact with the artists and get to explore their motivations to be part of AFF and this exhibition. What can only be fair is that I share their response so anyone can get to understand why new generations of artists and even artists who started in the traditional art world decided to join a Web3 community.

 

Mélissa Martinez

Mélissa Martinez, Endless Transmission, GIF, 4 editions, 39 Tez

 

  • Can you share more about the inspiration or creative process for your artwork?
  • In my art, I feel inspired by religion and various beliefs as well as the art of other cultures than mine. I’ve always been fascinated by polytheistic religion and the worship of idols. I often use goddesses in my drawing to treat really personal subjects as queer womxn in our society. Using symbols and traditional themes, I use my art as a catharsis to speak up about my place in the world, what bothers me and how I want my fellow womxn and queer people to feel safe and loved. I want to advocate for our bodies, anger, and strength as they are. Colorful work has always been something I’ve done, I love when it’s loud and clear!

     

  • What are the tools, and platforms you are currently using to create your artwork? Why those? Are you planning to learn or explore other digital tools/platforms? 
  • I mainly do digital art since the beginning of 2022. Before that, I had really classical training in traditional art, especially drawing and painting. I still do make traditional art from time to time.

    When I discovered digital art it opened a sea of possibilities. I work mainly on Procreate for digital drawing as well as my 2D animations. My animations often consist of loops that treat a particular subject, and I generally mint them as GIFs. My first mints were a series of three animations representing parts of a madonna (cf: “Holy Tears”, “Evil Eye” and “Delightful blood”).

    I would love to explore more 3D possibilities, maybe 3D sculpture, those presented in “Borderless” are stunning and they woke up an interest in me. Since I’m more invested in Web3, I’ve seen a ton of AI artwork and I really want to experiment with them too.

     

  • What is new for you about the 'Borderless' exhibition?
  • “Bordeless” is my second exhibition with the Art from Future DAO and it will always amaze me to see that many people being able to make something together so huge. We’re definitely more and more artists/curators/builders in each exhibition and the growth is really fast. I also really love the variety of proposals we have to show: sculpture, gif, video, 2d, clay art, and more… The space is incredibly well thought out to make all of our artworks go well together and I can’t thank the builders enough.

     

  • How did you get started on the Metaverse? What did you like about it and why you are still here?
  • Everything started when I discovered the account @artgirls_galerie on Instagram which is an art gallery focusing on womxn and their place in the art world. It was already a topic in which I feel really included and I saw that Annelise was really interested in Web3 and NFT. At this time, I had only a vague idea of what Nft was. She shared resources and led me to meet Jessy Jeanne's artworks and her DAO Art From Future. Jessy and Annelise also have the project Gxrls Revolution which offers to teach womxn how to set up their wallets, so I followed a workshop to set up mine and started minting my art. 

    I feel really free to mint whatever I want without the censorship I often face on social networks. It’s also a way for me to be able to sell my work without any gallery in between. 

    I chose the Tezos blockchain because it had the reputation of being more art-oriented and Tezos does not represent a big financial risk to start minting on a regular basis. I’m able to test a lot of different ways to present my work and how I price it, for example, this month of October, I started minting every day according to the Inktober Challenge. I’ve decided to price each artwork according to the day of the month so it goes up gradually until the 31st.

    I’m still here because I love the sense of community, there are so many people making events and supporting each other. I must say it feels great to support the work of other artists and become a collector myself.

     

    AViz

    Aviz, Infinite fraction, Jpeg, 4 editions, 39 tez

     

  • Can you share more about the inspiration or creative process for your artwork?
  • As a biological creature born into an analog world and kneaded by evolution, of course, I draw inspiration for my productions from this world. I try to make sense of everything about this world, from the past to the future, or just to face meaninglessness. I am watching the productions of my mind that let the confusion flow with today's tools.

     

  • What are the tools, and platforms you are currently using to create your artwork? Why those? Are you planning to learn or explore other digital tools/platforms? 
  • I don't know what will happen in the future, but right now I produce my works as jpg or animation with 3D rendering tools. The biggest reason I use them right now is that I want to train myself in this field. I completed my undergraduate education in architecture and my education did not allow me to freely use all the color, shade, and lighting knowledge I acquired. If the simulated worlds are rapidly developing tools, I am very happy to know that I will be freer in this field in the future.

     

  • What is new for you about the 'Borderless' exhibition?
  • Although I don't have much of an exhibition background, all the selections I've attended so far have been exciting for me. For the first time in this exhibition, I am very satisfied that there are so many free spirits from different nationalities.

     

  • How did you get started on the Metaverse? What did you like about it and why you are still here?
  • Of course, the most important factor is to be freer. As someone who has a Turkish passport, I am an artist stuck in these borders. Although it was not felt that much in developed countries, it was really difficult to produce as an artist in the covid and post-covid periods. The Metaverse was the continuation of that. I will continue to contribute to web3 as much as I can, rather than be ignored by corporate art authorities

     

    Leila 

    Alohaleila, Infinite loop of times, Png, 4 editions, 39 Tez

     

  • Can you share more about the inspiration or creative process for your artwork?
  • I am mostly inspired by Japan: the Showa era advertising and 80s graphic designers. It resonates with me in many ways and I feel this is where I belonged. 

    I also find my ideas in the Internet and computer culture and kitsch aesthetics. Above all, I believe art should be cool and I want to create art that brings joy and sparkle, and electricity. 

    Art and creativity are the essence of life and should make us feel and get more out of life. That is why I like art with many colors and shapes and vivacity. When life is fade, art is so much more.  

     

  • What are the tools, and platforms you are currently using to create your artwork? Why those? Are you planning to learn or explore other digital tools/platforms? 
  • I am exclusively on Objkt and Tezos is my favorite blockchain. I have tried Opensea and Ethereum but did not adhere to them. Instead, Tezos is incredibly cool, and Objkt highlights the artwork in the nicest and most simple way. 

    I find there a place for care: care for other artists, care for the art, care for the planet. The community is supportive, and it is an amazing space for artistic experimentation and expression. It is also the best place for creativity and inspiration because of the many artists represented from many different countries and backgrounds.

    I would love to step up my game and learn how to animate my collage. I want to learn how to bring life, motion, and rotation and make them spin or even in 3D.

    Also, I have curated so many pngs over time, I think it would be cool to somehow generate art with my collection.

     

  • What is new for you about the 'Borderless' exhibition?
  • It is impressive that blockchain brought in new tools that allow for immediate compensation and fair revenue sharing between artists, curators, and collaborators. 

    It is the second time I am taking part in a collaborative exhibition with Art From Future, the first one was Metadreams. 

    But this time, I am amazed at how many new artists are working with us, and how we really are together pushing the concept a big step further. We are more numerous, the exhibition will be much bigger and more impressive, there is a broader diversity in the art we display and we managed to bring our prices higher while remaining affordable.

     

  • How did you get started on the Metaverse? What did you like about it and why you are still here?
  • I started with Tumblr. Since 2010, I have created tons of blogs and collected thousands of nice images. I think I developed digital Diogenes syndrome because I was compulsively accumulating pictures. For fear that Tumblr would close one day, I saved all of them on hard drives but they were just sitting there. With NFTs, I found both a chance to value art and to display it. Also now, they really belong to me.

     

    João Salazar

    Joao Salazar, No lines in the sky, Jpeg, 4 editions, 39 Tez

     

  • Can you share more about the inspiration or creative process for your artwork?
  • Recently I have used my relationship with the internet and the virtual universe as a theme for my work, seeking to better understand how my perception is affected by virtuality and the excess of information. The use of modeling clay appears as an opposition because it is an extremely tactile material, which carries playful materiality, another anchor that I use to deal with deep issues using something that refers to our childhood. 

     

  • What are the tools, and platforms you are currently using to create your artwork? Why those? Are you planning to learn or explore other digital tools/platforms? 
  • Lately, I've been focusing mainly on Objtk because I decided to bring a balance between production and quality, so I can work well with all my arts.

     

  • What is new for you about the 'Borderless' exhibition?
  • I don't know if there is anything specifically new in the exhibition, but I really liked how it was built, the relationships between curators and artists, the different languages ​​and aesthetics talking to each other in the beautiful metaverse created.

     

  • How did you get started on the Metaverse? What did you like about it and why you are still here?
  • I started to have some experiences last year when I was introduced to Hic Et Nunc, after that it was an intense immersion in this amazing community that overflows art and artistic processes in many ways

     

    It was inspiring to read and connect with these artists who are the ones shaping how art will look in no time. The Metaverse is a new medium created by people and for people, and like every new technology, it still needs to reach critical mass and evolve into a technology that is accessible to all. Nevertheless, the fact that now artists can see the value and are exploring different platforms, wallets, marketplaces ad so on, is only the tip of the iceberg for the shifts that this technology will bring into the art world. The real challenge for us, Web2 people, is to change our mindset and embrace the change. There was a time that credit cards and Paypal generated a lot of skepticism but now they are the most useful ways to carry out financial transactions. Or previous generations couldn’t imagine car and home sharing, but now we use Uber and Airbnb several times a year. 

     

    Article written by Estefania Puente

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